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Features

Iran Tightens Grip on Press with New Dress Codes

May 15, 2024
Behnaz Mir Motaharian
2 min read
The intensification of pressure on Iran's domestic press in recent years, especially after the Woman, Life, Freedom movement, has extended to newspapers affiliated with the Islamic Republic
The intensification of pressure on Iran's domestic press in recent years, especially after the Woman, Life, Freedom movement, has extended to newspapers affiliated with the Islamic Republic
Furthermore, the newspaper is set to implement the "Noor" plan in its newsroom, compelling both women and men working within the institute to adhere to special clothing regulations
Furthermore, the newspaper is set to implement the "Noor" plan in its newsroom, compelling both women and men working within the institute to adhere to special clothing regulations
Amid these escalating pressures and purges, Ehsan Salehi, the newly appointed director of the Iran Foundation, the government-affiliated owner of the Iran newspaper, has introduced a directive mandating specific attire for both male and female employees
Amid these escalating pressures and purges, Ehsan Salehi, the newly appointed director of the Iran Foundation, the government-affiliated owner of the Iran newspaper, has introduced a directive mandating specific attire for both male and female employees

The intensification of pressure on Iran's domestic press in recent years, especially after the Woman, Life, Freedom movement, has extended to newspapers affiliated with the Islamic Republic.

Amid these escalating pressures and purges, Ehsan Salehi, the newly appointed director of the Iran Foundation, the government-affiliated owner of the Iran newspaper, has introduced a directive mandating specific attire for both male and female employees.

Furthermore, the newspaper is set to implement the "Noor" plan in its newsroom, compelling both women and men working within the institute to adhere to special clothing regulations.

However, this issue is not confined to government newspapers alone; evidence suggests a deteriorating situation for journalists across the Iranian press landscape.

As pressure mounts on Iran's domestic press with the increasing arrests of journalists, the government is solidifying its control by imposing stricter regulations, particularly within its affiliated newspapers.

In a move towards uniformity, numerous directors associated with reformists as well as those close to Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's government have been dismissed to impose more rigid frameworks within these media outlets.

According to reports from the Khabar Fouri website on Monday, Ehsan Salehi has initiated mandatory dress codes for female employees and restricted attire for male employees within the Iran newspaper.

Female employees in government newspapers are now required to wear a particular form of the headscarf, long coats (below the knees), and dark-colored clothing, while male employees are limited to long-sleeved shirts and cloth pants.

Notably, wearing jeans is prohibited for male staff in the Iran newspaper.

Although management claims no official directive has been issued, all employees are expected to comply with verbal instructions.

Failure to adhere to this notification may result in severe consequences, as employees have been threatened with disciplinary action for non-compliance.

Before this verbal directive, upon assuming leadership, the new management undertook significant restructuring, resulting in the dismissal of many journalists.

In recent years, the government has sought to assert greater control over the media.

Alongside the arrest of journalists, it has appointed media managers from among those who have demonstrated loyalty to the Islamic Republic in various capacities.

The implications of these changes extend beyond media performance, impacting female journalists disproportionately due to mandatory hijab regulations, providing further pretext for their dismissal by government officials.

Female journalists face additional challenges, encountering numerous obstacles outside editorial offices in their efforts to work and gather news.

Reports received by IranWire highlight the hurdles female photographers and journalists encounter in accessing locations to capture images and reports.

One sports photographer, covering women's competitions, recounted pressure from venue officials to wear headscarves.

"For several weeks, whenever we attended competitions as women, the game supervisor insisted that all photographers must wear a particular form of headscarf. It was emphasized that without that, photography would not be permitted."

Similarly, female reporters visiting government organizations for news preparation are pressured to adhere to specific dress codes.

Without such attire, they are denied the opportunity to work professionally and gather news.

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