By: Ali Mamouri for Al-Monitor Iran Pulse Posted on June 2.
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In the past two decades, the extensive money allocated by religious institutions to their books and libraries section — alongside the foundation and expansion of educational centers — have turned the city of Qom into a rich source for books on religion, humanities and literature, not only in Iran but also in the region.  Although the idea of hidden and banned books and libraries in the age of communication and expulsion of information is difficult to imagine, this phenomenon still has a substantial presence in the Hawza of Qom.

 

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